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He Shall Confirm a Covenant? 4

The subject material for the End Times is massive, requiring an impressive number of Bible verses simply to effectively cover the main topics. Regardless of the number of verses devoted to the subject, Daniel 9:24–27 will certainly stand as a cornerstone to the subject and is one of the most likely to be misinterpreted. It is from this section the name the Great Consummation is derived, along with its duration and notification of the coming Messiah and His new covenant. As previously mentioned, God intentionally concealed much of the End Times information, holding fast to revelation until the time of the end. The concealment resulted in a high misinterpretation ratio for Daniel 9:24–27. For this reason, the Seventy Weeks of Daniel must be handled with great care. Be advised, misconstruing Daniel 9:24–27 is comparable to a topographer calculating a bearing using east instead of west and then wondering why people become disoriented. At the very least, the topographer will send his or her reader in the opposite or wrong direction. The most common mistake made with Daniel 9:27 is to incorrectly identify the person of the prince in verse 26 and then apply this error to the pronoun he in verse 27. The answer to “he” is paramount to discovering the true purpose of and for the overall prophecy. Because the Seventy Weeks of Daniel must be covered meticulously and the four verses contain volumes of previously hidden information, it is necessary for these four verses to be repeated frequently. The obvious advantage is readers will become incredibly familiar with the four primary verses and eventually learn the meaning behind the Seventy Weeks of Daniel prophecy.7-seals

So let’s dig in!

Verse 27 begins by saying, “and he shall confirm a covenant with many for one week.” Jesus will confirm the covenant with many for seven years. Through the insights found in verses 24 through 27, it can be determined Jesus is the personage of the pronoun he in verse 27. Regardless of the evidence, pre-tribulation rapture teachers claim the pronoun he refers to the Beast. Only through the preeminence of the pre-tribulation rapture doctrine and the lesser but still widely accepted mid- and post-tribulation rapture doctrines is the pronoun “he” ever allowed to be portrayed as the Beast.  Such usage is untenable. Supporters of this mistaken hypothesis attempt to validate their allegations by claiming the pronoun “he” is justifiably attached to the noun prince from verse 26. These advocates apply a fabricated form of anonymity to the word prince so it may be used to support this inaccuracy. It must be invented because the definition and character of the word prince is well-known and incongruous with the character of the Beast. Once again, Christians need to take scripture in context both grammatically and historically to properly interpret what a given scripture is meant to convey.

Trusting the Lord

Grammatically, the original text was translated from the Masoretic Hebrew text or from the official version of the Tanakh, “tan’-ock,” a canonized version of the Hebrew Bible. In both cases, the English punctuation rules did not apply. The text was later translated into the King’s English. Though some of the rules have changed, a colon is used at the end of an independent clause to indicate the next phrase or sentence is additional information about the previous sentence. When properly used in this manner, the colon can help to more fully explain, embellish, or elaborate on the previous independent clause, thereby providing a fuller picture or image for the reader to understand. As seen in the following, the first clause in verse 26 ends with a colon.

And after sixty-two weeks shall Messiah be cut off, but not for himself: and the people of the prince that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary; and the end thereof shall be with a flood, and unto the end of the war desolations are determined. (Daniel 9:26 KJV)

When using the punctuation rule correctly, it should be understood the information following the colon in verse 26 applies to the previous or first sentence of the verse. The colon in verse 26 is placed after the word himself, indicating the sentence that follows is to expand upon the subject of the previous sentence. The subject of the previous sentence is the Messiah, who is to be sacrificed. The phrases “Messiah the Prince” in verse 25 and “people of the prince” in verse 26 both use the Hebrew word nagiyd for the English word prince. As just covered, the Hebrew word nagiyd is indicative of a noble prince or leader. Every reference to a “prince” in the Seventy Weeks of Daniel prophecy speaks of a noble individual. There is not one allusion or inference toward an ignoble individual anywhere within the Seventy Weeks of Daniel prophecy or text. More important, the word nagiyd in the Seventy Weeks of Daniel prophecy fits the character and profile for the Messiah and clearly does not fit the character of the Beast. To claim “he” is referring to the Beast is a classic example of twisting scripture.

If you have not noticed it already, the Seventy Weeks of Daniel prophecy contains elements of split-versing. This can be easily seen in verses 26 and 27, which will be broken into parts A and B. Part A applies to the three and a half years of Christ’s ministry, while part B applies to the three and a half years of the Great Consummation, which takes place at the end of the Latter Days.

Daniel 9:26 and 27 parts a & b:

26a: “and after sixty-two weeks shall Messiah be cut off, but not for himself:”

26b: “and the people of the prince [“Nagiyd” noble prince] that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary: and the end thereof shall be with a flood, and unto the end of the war desolations are determined

27a: “and he shall confirm the covenant with many for one week: and in the midst of the week he shall cause the sacrifice and the oblation to cease,”

contract pic

You know, a contract

27b: “and for the overspreading of abominations he shall make it desolate, even until the consummation, and that determined shall be poured upon the desolate.”

Daniel 9:27a

By reducing key words within each Bible verse to their fundamental definitions we can arrive at the closest original meaning the author would likely have intended. With this in mind, we will in the next blog look at the words confirm and covenant as Daniel understood them on the day he put pen to paper, or maybe that was papyrus.

We will begin here at the previous paragraph when we meet again next time in:

The Twilight Zone…. do, do, do, do; do, do, do, do, dooooo… can’t you just hear the rise and fall of the melody? do, do, do, do; do, do, do, do, dooooo…

For questions or comments: Harrel Steve 4x5x300

Have a blessed day! 😃

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